Jukani

When photographers visit.

We had the pleasure of receiving a most wonderful email from Karel Vandersloten.  He came for a visit to the three SAASA Sanctuaries – Monkeyland, Birds of Eden and Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary.  Then as a bonus he send us a great email thanking us but it is us who should thank him for sharing these great photos with us.

When I showed this photo to some of the staff they could not believe that this was taken just out side Monkeyland.  This is actually a photo of the Monkeyland Farm, where we prepare food for the animals – this is seen by us as place where we work very hard.  Yet in the words of Khaya our receptionist: “Through the eyes of Karel this looks like an exotic place where you buy the postcards so you can show everyone how amazing it is”. I think that pretty much sums up this amazing photo:

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Amazing right?  Well see below for more photos of Karel’s visit.

Herewith Karel Vandersloten’s photos of MONKEYLAND

Herewith Karel Vandersloten’s photo of BIRDS OF EDEN

Herewith Karel Vandersloten’s photos of JUKANI WILDLIFE SANCTUARY 

The story of 2 Ladies and 2 Lions

The story of 2 Ladies and 2 Lions

Thanks to the determination of two amazing woman – Drew and Maxine – two little lion cubs – Lia and Elsa – have arrived at their Safe Final Forever home, Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary. When asked how she feels about that, Drew says “Relieved! Relieved with the knowledge that they (Lia and Elsa) will be safe for the rest of their lives.”

So we would like to WELCOME Lia and Elsa to the South African Animal Sanctuary Alliance and their new home at Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary.  Lia is a tawny 6 month old Lioness and Elsa a 9 month old white Lioness…or should I say Lioness in the making.

Finally Safe

Lia is not the first (or only) lion cub that Drew has saved. To date 10 lions have been saved thanks to Drew. When Maxine first met Elsa she felt a strong connection, and from this first moment, she knew she had to save her. We believe that this will also not be the last lion Maxine saves.

Lia

Lia

Due to the abuse that Lia (the tawny lion cub) had to endure in her earliest days – living in a hamster size cage and being fed nothing but camel milk – her growth is severely stunted. Lia is however under the care now of our amazing Vet Brendan Tindall who feels comfortable that Lia will be much better off now that she is here at Jukani and on a safer healthier diet. Before her rescue, Lia also suffered a broken left shoulder which was not taken care of. As result, she might always walk with a slight limp and be smaller than the other lions but she makes up for that in attitude.

Elsa

Elsa

Elsa has endured emotional and physical abuse which she now needs to recover from, and we hope that living with Lia with whom she has already bonded, and being free from human interference will help her become a confident lioness.
SAASA (South African Animal Sanctuary Alliance) and especially the Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary team would like to take this opportunity and say WELCOME Lia and Elsa. As well as saying thank you! Thank you to Drew and Brian Abrahamson, Maxine Prins, PAWS SA – Hilton Button, The Pet Lounge, Pets want to travel, Paul Tully, Jill Burton, Diana Zulficker, Hesham Sheta, Dr Abdullah Hassin, Vet Brendan Tindall and our team!

Maxine, Vet Brendan, Jill and Drew

Maxine, Vet Brendan, Jill and Drew

So if you are looking for something amazing to do….come and visit our Sanctuaries and welcome these new arrivals.

Four Tswalu wild dogs

Thanks to a joint agreement between Tswalu, Endangered Wildlife Trust and Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary, four wild dogs will stay at the Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary on a temporary basis.

Once a reserve large enough is found where the Wilddogs can safely be released and their future secure, will they be released back into the wild. Not only will Jukani visitors have the privilege of seeing these beautiful painted dogs whilst at our Sanctuary but guests will leave with the knowledge that these four will be released and that the conservation of wild dogs in nature is ongoing.

The four Wild dogs arrived from the red sands of the beautiful Kalahari on Thursday 9 October to their new home in the lush green forests of the Garden Route outside Plettenberg Bay.

Wild dogs Arriving at Jukani

Wild dogs Arriving at Jukani

Wild dogs have arrived

Wild dogs have arrived

Wild dogs checking out their new home

Wild dogs checking out their new home

Here is some really fun and amazing facts about African Painted Wild Dogs:
• The scientific name for the African Wild dog means “painted wolf”. No two wild dogs have the same markings, which makes them easily identifiable as individuals. This is why the original name “African Wild Dog” has been changed to “African Painted Wild Dog)
• African wild dogs have huge home ranges and are constant wanderers. In the Serengeti the estimated size of each pack’s territory is 1,500 km2. An area the size of Greater London, which is home to 7.5 million people, could therefore only support one or two African wild dog packs.
• Unlike many other species, once they reach maturity it is the males that stay within their natal pack while females migrate and join new packs.
• Pups that are old enough to eat solid food are given priority at a kill, even over the dominant pair.
• The dogs have a peculiar rather playful ceremony that bonds them for a common purpose and initiates each hunt. They start circulating among the other pack members, vocalizing and touching until they get excited and are ready to hunt.
• African wild dogs are intelligent and cooperative hunters. Some of the dogs run close to the prey while the others fall behind. They then take over when the front members tire.
• When feeding, they lack aggression towards each other and share the kill; even with members who may not have been involved in the actual hunt.
• The entire African wild dog pack shares responsibility for protecting the cubs, with both males and females babysitting the young.

Heritage Day for South Africa

 

 

 

 

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24 SEPTEMBER 2015 = HERITAGE DAY / BRAAI DAY

Heritage Day is a South African public holiday celebrated on 24 September. On this day, South Africans across the spectrum are encouraged to celebrate their culture and the diversity of their beliefs and traditions, in the wider context of a nation that belongs to all its people.  Somewhere along the line this day became BRAAI DAY (BBQ Day)

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I have to say that this day means a lot to me personally!  How can you go forward if you do not know where you come from.  The one thing to remember is …. know where you come from but don’t stay there….take that knowledge…grow…move forward!

So I ask you this Heritage Day…look at your heritage and ask yourself….what am I leaving for generations to come!

 

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